Past Events

To see a list of past Asian Art Association events from 1999 to 2010, please click here.

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-2017 AAA Annual Meeting and Auction-

Asian Fusion Auction

Donations now being accepted by May 7th

Click here for donation forms and instructions

Email completed form(s) to Trudy Turvey at trudyturveypt@gmail.com or call her at 303-819-3494 to arrange delivery of your item(s) or experiences.

Quality items or experiences with a minimum value of $100 or greater are appreciated.

 

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-Curator's Circle and Asian Art Association Lecture Series-

Wednesday, May 10, 2017, 12-1pm

Chinese Calligraphy: Not Just a View Art

Harrison Xinshi Tu

 

Among all Chinese arts, calligraphy stands out as the most unique visual representation of Chinese philosophy and aesthetic taste. An excellent calligraphy is not just a piece of beautiful visual art; it is also a reflection of the artist's interpretation of a belief or a philosophical concept. In this presentation, Chinese calligrapher Harrison Xinshi Tu will elaborate on contemporary Chinese calligraphy through his artistic journey and introduce the DAM's collection of his art which is on display in the Asian gallery. Lecture group will visit the gallery under the direction of Mr. Tu. Non-DAM members must purchase a General Admission ticket as well as a lecture ticket.

During the ten years he has lived in the United States, Mr. Tu has become a devoted proponent of exchange and mutual understanding between the East and West. Since 1994, he has served as Editor-in-Chief of the Chinese American Post, a Chinese-language newspaper available to the entire Rocky Mountain region. Currently a visiting professor at the Naropa University in Boulder teaching Traditional Chinese Calligraphy, he also serves as an overseas researcher for the Chinese Calligraphy Institute of Beijing University, China.

Image: Harrison Xinshi Tu. Courtesy of Harrison X. Tu.

Time: 12-1pm, May 10, 2017

Location: Lower Level Lecture Room, North Building, Denver Art Museum

Ticketing through DAM: Call 720-913-0130, stop by the ticketing desk in the museum, or click here to purchase online. Create an account, or sign in with your DAM member number to finish the purchase. Prices are for AAA lecture only and do not include gallery admission.

Ticket prices in addition to general admission:

AAA Members free

Students / Teachers / Docents $5

DAM members $7

General Public $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040  blittle@denverartmuseum.org

 

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-Curator's Circle and Asian Art Association Lecture Series-

Tuesday, April 18, 2017, 6:30-7:30pm

The Rama Epic: Hero, Heroine, Ally, Foe

Forrest McGill, PhD

 

Demons and monkeys battle. Noblemen and women fall in love, perform valiant deeds, and sometimes betray each other. Both the magical events of the world of superheroes and real human experiences familiar to us all fill the stories of the legendary Indian prince Rama. This talk by Dr. Forrest McGill of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco focuses on the Rama epic’s four main characters—the divine hero, the stalwart heroine, the powerful monkey ally, and the ten-headed demon king--as they are portrayed in ancient and contemporary sculptures, paintings, and theater arts, including works from the Denver Art Museum.

Forrest McGill is has worked for forty years as a museum administrator and a teacher, curator, and researcher in Asian art. His most recent project was the major international exhibition “The Rama Epic: Hero, Heroine, Ally, Foe” at the Asian Art Museum this past winter, and the substantial accompanying publication. He holds a PhD in Asian Art History from the University of Michigan.

 

Image: Hanuman flies to the Himalayas for magical herbs, page from the Mewar Ramayana, 1649-1653, by Sahibdin (Indian, active approx. 1625-1660). Opaque watercolors on paper. The British Libarary, Add. MS 15297(1) f.100r. Courtesy Asian Art Museum, San Francisco.


Time: 6:30-7:30pm, April 18, 2017

Location: Sharp Auditorium, Hamilton Building, Denver Art Museum

Ticketing through DAM: Call 720-913-0130, stop by the ticketing desk in the museum, or click here to purchase online. Create an account, or sign in with your DAM member number to finish the purchase. Prices are for AAA lecture only and do not include gallery admission.

Free Admission, RSVP requested

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040  blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by: Asian Art Association

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-Curator's Circle and Asian Art Association Lecture Series-

Wednesday, March 15, 2017, 12-1pm 

Joomchi: The Art of Paper Felting Anew

Sammy Seung-min Lee

 

To artist Sammy Seung-min Lee balancing two modes of art making: one is bookbinding, and the other is joomchi, a traditional Korean technique of beating papers to create collages; mimics the symmetry of life. Both processes involve paper and are intensely time consuming – book making requires 3D engineering, building maquettes, and fabricating multiples; joomchi calls for equally laborious hours of pounding and kneading to record creases, crinkles, and lines in layers of papers. However, narratives are “written” and “bound” in book making, while stories are “released” and “deconstructed” in joomchi works. Through the materiality of paper, discover stories embedded within its subtle, often unnoticed details. Join us for an exploration of the joomchi side of Ms Lee’s art.

 

Sammy Seung-min Lee is an interdisciplinary artist and a proprietor of Studio SML |k in Denver, Colorado. Her book and paper works focus on spatial, narrative, and sequential qualities, as she incorporates her diverse studies in fine art, design and architecture. Lee was born and raised in Seoul, South Korea and moved to Southern California at the age of sixteen.  She studied fine art and media design at UCLA and architecture at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.  Sammy also learned bookbinding under the tutelage of master bookbinder Daniel Kelm in Easthampton, Massachusetts.  Her work has been exhibited internationally and can be found in collections at the Getty Research Institute, Bainbridge Island Museum of Art, Spencer Museum of Art, and the Spanish National Library in Madrid, Spain.

Artist Statement:
With a peripatetic upbringing, my personal idea of identity is an amalgamation of fragments from various places, rather than any one specific narrative. My creative practice reflects this as a result, balancing primarily two modes of art making: one is book binding, and the other is joomchi, a traditional Korean technique of beating papers to create collages. Both processes involve paper and are intensely time consuming – book making requires 3D engineering, building maquettes, and fabricating multiples; joomchi calls for equally laborious hours of pounding and kneading to record creases, crinkles, and lines in layers of papers. 

But the similarities are outweighed by the antithetical nature of these processes. Book making is often more intentional and methodical while the act of joomchi is more spontaneous and uninhibited. Narratives are “written” and “bound” in book making, while stories are “released” and “deconstructed” in joomchi works. Despite the apparent contradiction, practicing and balancing both art forms is essential to my practice. Through the materiality of paper, I discover stories embedded within its subtle, often unnoticed details. These are the stories I seek to highlight in my work.

Image above left: Sammy Seung-min Lee, Clothed #7, hanji and water, installed at Nancy Benson Thread Studio, Denver Art Museum, 2016. Courtesy Studio SML |k.
Image above right: Sammy Seung-min Lee. Courtesy Redline Gallery.


Time: 12-1pm, March 15, 2017

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Building, Denver Art Museum

Ticketing through DAM: Call 720-913-0130, stop by the ticketing desk in the museum, or click here to purchase online. Create an account, or sign in with your DAM member number to finish the purchase. Prices are for AAA lecture only and do not include gallery admission.

AAA Members free

Students / Teachers / Docents $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

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-Curator's Circle and Asian Art Association Lecture Series-

Tuesday, March 7, 2017, 6:30-7:30pm, followed by reception

The Learned Ganesha of Cambodia

Dr. Peter D. Sharrock

 

Join us as Dr Peter Sharrock of London University explores the history of Ganesha, the great, cultivated, elephant-headed Hindu god capable of solving all problems, long loved by merchants, scholars and writers, and worshipped before all major undertakings as the lord who removes snags and encumbrances.  Literate and blessed with the high intelligence of elephants, he has a rounded paunch, a broken tusk and his vehicle is a cunning rat.  In medieval Southeast Asia, he received a fond royal welcome among the Buddhist Cambodian and the Cham peoples who both venerated this benevolent form of Shiva ‘Badhreshvara’ at the vast forest temple complex of Koh Ker, and in 12th century Angkor Wat.

Dr Peter D. Sharrock teaches the art history of the Angkorian Khmer Empire and the Esoteric Buddhist and Hindu art of maritime Asia from 800 to 1400 CE at London University’s School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS).  His passion for the art of Indochina and Southeast Asia was behind his signing up as Reuters’ chief correspondent during the American war in Indochina. Only in the 1990s, after the fall of Pol Pot and after Vietnam’s ‘open-door’ policy made Vietnam again accessible to the world, could scholars and tourists access the great temple complexes of Cambodia. He now teaches in the History of Art and Archaeology Department of the School and is a member of the SOAS Academic Art Programme (SAAAP) that oversees the implementation of a $30 million donation from the Alphawood Foundation in Chicago to enhance teaching and research in Southeast Asian art. The Programme provides student scholarships and builds bridges to the universities, museums and heritage institutions focused on conserving the rich art heritage of the region.

Image above left: Statue of Ganesha in the Asian Civilizations Museum, Singapore.
Image above right: Peter D. Sharrock. Courtesy of speaker.


Time: 6:30-7:30pm, March 7, 2017

Location:  Schlessman Hall, North Building, Denver Art Museum

Ticketing through DAM: Call 720-913-0130, stop by the ticketing desk in the museum, or click here to reserve online. Create an account, or sign in with your DAM member number to finish the purchase. Prices are for AAA lecture only and do not include gallery admission.

Free Admission, RSVP requested

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

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-Curator's Circle and Asian Art Association Lecture Series-

Wednesday, February 15, 2017, 12-1pm 

Time Travel by Thangka: Tibetan Treasures at the Asian Art Museum

Jeffrey Durham, PhD

 

For six hundred years, Tibet has been home to a religious tradition based on texts called the terma or treasures. Some of these texts occur in the context of thangka paintings or rare illuminated manuscripts; some were even viewed as actual bodies of the figures represented on them. Using the rich visual and narrative sources available in Tibetan thangka paintings associated with the terma tradition recovered from a monastery called Riwoche; this presentation explores how artworks associated with this tradition share many thematic and formal characteristics with tradition of speculative fiction more or less recently produced by Euro-American authors. Among these themes and characteristics are virtual bodies, time travel, altered identities, signs of a special destiny, and coded messages designed to be discovered at just the right time.

Jeffrey Durham is a museum curator creating cutting-edge art exhibitions that challenge boundaries of genre, culture, and identity such as Enter the Mandala, an exhibit using Tibetan thangka paintings to create a tantric mandala in the Asian Art Museum's architectural space, with the goal of having the visitor question, "Am I in the mandala, or is the mandala in me?" An experienced professor and historian of sacred art, with emphasis on South Asian and Himalayan sculpture and painting, Dr. Durham speaks / reads five languages at a professional working level and four more at a limited level, and he is a registered yoga teacher. Among his many publications is the catalog for a 2015 exhibit at AAM, Awaken: A Tibetan Buddhist Journey to Enlightenment.

Image above left: Padmasambhava as Guru Drakpochy. Courtesy Asian Art Museum San Francisco, 1992.394.
Image above right: Jeffrey Durham, PhD. Courtesy of Jeffrey Durham.


Time: 12-1pm, February 15, 2017

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Building, Denver Art Museum

Ticketing through DAM: Call 720-913-0130, stop by the ticketing desk in the museum, or click here to purchase online. Create an account, or sign in with your DAM member number to finish the purchase. Prices are for AAA lecture only and do not include gallery admission.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students / Teachers / Docents $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

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 -Asian Art Association Program and Holiday Party-

Saturday, January 28, 2017 (Chinese New Year)

6:30pm 

 

 

6:30pm - Rewiring Bharata Natyam for the 21st Century: A Lecture-Demonstration by Choreographer Parijat Desai

7:30-9pm - Holiday Party

Choreographer Parijat Desai will describe the classic rhythmic composition jathi, the sculptural positions of steps, and the abhinaya or gesture and facial storytelling forms of bharata natyam classical Indian dance, and how she rewires them using contemporary dance technique. Accompanied by local musicians Aaron Paige and Pirya Hariharan, this extraordinary New York based choreographer and dancer will share a few Krishna stories and present a new dance to a familiar song!

The holiday party for members and guests will follow: Come join us as we welcome in the Chinese New Year! Have a drink, eat a little, chat with the artist, and catch up with old friends! Free well drinks (1/person with ticket), catered hors d'oeuvres, and baked goodies. The AAA Board has received special permission to hold our reception in this building, designed by Roth Sheppard Architects, this is a rare opportunity to see where the real work of the Denver Art Museum takes place.

 

Parijat Desai is an India-born, U.S.-raised choreographer who strives to cross boundaries of culture, identity, and nation through dance performance. She draws on contemporary dance, bharata natyam, theater, and other forms to create hybrid movement languages. Parijat also interfaces with architectural site and public space to explore human experience and social issues through the performing body. As choreographer for Parijat Desai Dance Company, Parijat Desai strives to create an organic and kinetic blend of Indian classical and Western contemporary dance. She has devoted her life to training in these radically different movement systems, and to finding bridges between them. For more information, visit Parijat Desai's website or facebook page.

 

Aaron Paige specializes in the classical, folk, and popular music of India and its diaspora. At present, his research explores issues of language, class, and race in Tamil-language hip-hop from Malaysia. In addition to his research interests, Aaron is a performer of South Indian classical and folk music, Javanese Gamelan, Ghanaian drumming, and Arabic music. At University of Denver he teaches sections of Music, Society, and Culture for majors and non-majors, a course on global hip-hop and leads Lamont's Ghanaian and South Indian music ensembles.

 

Mrs. Priya Hariharan is an accomplished Indian classical violinist and vocalist. Priya has been teaching Carnatic music for over a decade, and humbly attributes her musical success to the blessings of her guru and parents. Carnatic music is sung before learning the instrumentation to learn the flow. Priya began her musical training on the violin at the age of six under direction of the late Sri Ramakrishna Sharma from Bombay. Later she moved to Sri Lalgudi G Jayaraman, a notable violinist and senior musician in Chennai and moved into Carnatic music through happenstance. She opened the Bhairavi School of Music in 1999 and is a full time musician and teacher.

 

Images from top to bottom:
Rooster. Courtesy of ideas.hallmark.com
Parijat Desai. Courtesy of the artist.
Aaron Paige. Courtesy of DU webpage.
Priya Hariharan. Courtesy of desishades.com.
 

Location:

6:30pm Sharp Auditorium, Hamilton Building, Denver Art Museum

7:30pm Bannock Office Building, 2nd floor, Noey Zone (1226 Bannock St.)

RSVP online, call 720-913-0040, or email blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Asian Art Association members: free

General public: $15

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-Curator's Circle and Asian Art Association Lecture Series-

Friday, January 13, 2017, 6:30pm 

Going into Markets: Ceramic Pillows of Cizhou Ware in 10th - 13th Century China

Chen Shen, PhD

 

During the Song and Jin dynasties of China (10th - 13th centuries) a decorative day-to-day household item, ceramic pillows of Cizhou ware, stand as symbols of the cultural commodities market. Where were they made, and how did they become a popular market product? Dr. Chen Shen gives an overview of the collection of Cizhou ware pillows at the Royal Ontario Museum, and explores features of the product that reflect commercial markets of the time, i.e.: how technology and design changes in craftsmanship were in accord with marketing growth (reducing production costs, employing skilled workers gathered in a central location, maximizing molding production, etc.). Evidence also points to active publicizing of brands / workshops by competitive quality control (advertising). Dr. Shen will reconstruct a vivid urban life with prospectus markets that were guided by public aesthetic tastes as well as need for company profits.

Dr. Chen Shen currently serves as the Vice President of World Culture at the Royal Ontario Museum, Canada, and Bishop White Chair and Senior Curator of East Asian Art and Archaeology. He gained his PhD in 1997 from the University of Toronto in the field of anthropological archaeology and has led several Paleolithic fieldwork projects in China including the World Heritage Site - the Peking Man site at Zhoukoudian. Dr. Shen's research areas include human evolution and the Paleolithic archaeology, cultural heritage management, and museum studies. His curatorial responsibilities include the museum's East Asian collection, but his research focuses on art and archaeological materials of prehistory, Bronze Age, and early imperial China. During this nearly twenty years tenure at the ROM, Dr. Shen has led and curated enormous exhibitions both ROM collection-based and major traveling exhibitions from China, such as The Warrior Emperor and China's Terracotta Army, 2010 and The Forbidden City: Inside Court of China's Emperor, 2014-16.

Image above left: Ceramic Pillow, China, Northern Song period (960-1126), glazed ceramic, Cizhou ware. Denver Art Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. William K.M. Chak, 2001.302.
Image above right: 
Chen Shen, PhD. Courtesy of C. Shen.


Time: 6:30pm, January 13, 2017

Location:  Sharp Auditorium, Hamilton Building, Denver Art Museum

RSVP: Call 720-913-0130, stop by the ticketing desk in the museum, or click here to RSVP online. Create an account, or sign in with you DAM member number to finish the reservation.

No charge, RSVP requested

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

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-Curator's Circle and Asian Art Association Lecture Series-

Wednesday, December 14, 2016, 12-1pm 

Two Great Traditions: Japanese Ceramics and the Art of Tea

Dr. Andrew L. Maske 

 

Since at least the 1500s Japanese ceramics have been heavily influenced by the custom of formalized tea drinking often referred to as "the tea ceremony." While not in fact a ceremony, the discipline of chanoyu does use choreographed movement and planning, enabling participants to focus on the aesthetics and feelings particular to an event. As utensils for the making and drinking of tea, ceramics play an important role in chanoyu, reflecting the focus on providing a unique experience at each gathering. This lecture will explore the influence of tea on Japanese ceramics over the past 400 years. 

 

Dr. Andrew L. Maske is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Kentucky and a native of Wheat Ridge. After completing a BFA in Fine Arts at Oklahoma Baptist University and spending seven years researching historical ceramics, the arts of Tea, and other art forms in Japan, Dr. Maske earned his doctoral degree at Oxford University in 1995. As curator at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, he was organizer of the ground-breaking exhibition and catalogue, Geisha: Beyond the Painted Smile (2003). His book on the Japanese tea ceramic Takatori ware, Potters and Patrons in Edo Period Japan: Takatori Ware and the Kuroda Domain, was published in 2011. Dr. Maske has contributed to curatorial and research projects at the Honolulu Academy of Arts, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Image above left: Takatori ware water jar (mizusashi), stoneware, 18th century. Collection of A. Maske.
Image above right: Andrew Maske. Courtesy of A. Maske.


Time: 12-1pm, December 14, 2016

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Building, Denver Art Museum

Ticketing through DAM: Call 720-913-0130, stop by the ticketing desk in the museum, or click here to purchase online. Create an account, or sign in with you DAM member number to finish the purchase. Prices are for AAA lecture only and do not include gallery admission.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

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-Curator's Circle and Asian Art Association Lecture Series-

Friday, November 18, 2016, 6:30pm 

From "Elusive Delight" to "No Sense, No Content" – The Thinking in My Works

Liu Jianhua

 

World-renown Chinese ceramic artist Liu Jianhua will present the trail of his thinking in creating many of his intriguing and appealing works over the past two decades. Liu's seductive and provocative porcelain works and installations have been highly recognized for their visual and phenomenological impact on viewers. 

As a serious thinker of social and political issues, Liu's socially engaged arts reflect the transformation of contemporary Chinese arts and society. From his early sculptural series of female body parts surrealistically presented in qipao dresses and reclining on fine dishes, bathtubs or chairs, to the "Floating Landscape" and "Dream" series exploring the impacts of the rapid development on people's life, spirit, and the environment, and more recent works reflecting on various social phenomena, Liu's artistic practice has intertwined with the history of China's porcelain and the changes in China's Reform Era (1978-present).

Image above left: Blank paper, ceramics. Courtesy of the artist.
Image above right: Liu Jianhua. Courtesy of the artist.


Time: 6:30pm, November 18, 2016, reception to follow

Location:  Sharp Auditorium, Hamilton Building, Denver Art Museum

RSVP: Call 720-913-0130, stop by the ticketing desk in the museum, or click here to RSVP online. Create an account, or sign in with you DAM member number to finish the reservation.

No charge, RSVP requested

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

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-Curator's Circle and Asian Art Association Lecture Series-

Wednesday, October 19, 2016, 12-1pm 

History of the Kimono

Dr. Hiroko Johnson 

 

Originally an imported fashion from China, made popular by courtesans (who wore their under clothing as fashion, just like Madonna!), kimono have evolved to become the iconic dress of Japan.  Follow the development of design, uses, style and decorative techniques in kimono with Dr. Hiroko Johnson, Professor Emeritus and Lecturer in Japanese Art History, San Diego State University.   

 

Dr. Hiroko Johnson is an art historian specializing in Japanese art history. She received a PhD from the University of Southern California and was a post-doctoral fellow at University of Tokyo in Japan. She specializes in Asian art and brought Japanese culture to her students by taking them on annual study tours to Japan. Currently an Emeritus Professor at San Diego State University, she received the Most Outstanding Faculty Member award in 2011. In San Diego she is on the board of the Japanese Friendship Garden and has co-curated the woodblock prints collection of the San Diego Museum of Art. She has numerous publications in both Japanese and English, including a monograph titled "Western Influences on Japanese Art: the Akita Ranga School and Foreign Books" in which she introduced the West to the Akita Ranga Art school, Japan's first art school to apply the Western painting techniques in Japan.

Image above: Geisha and Attendant in snow by  Kitagawa Utamaro  1790s. (taken from Geisha Beyond the Painted Smile, edit. the Peabody Essex Museum. Salem: Geroge Braziller, Inc., 2004)


Time: 12-1pm, October 19, 2016

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Building, Denver Art Museum

Ticketing through DAM: Call 720-913-0130, stop by the ticketing desk in the museum, or click here to purchase online. Create an account, or sign in with you DAM member number to finish the purchase. Prices are for AAA lecture only and do not include gallery admission.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

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Saturday, October 1, 2016, 10am-4pm 

Medicine as Art/Art as Medicine: An Exploration of Healing with Asian Art and Medicine

How is medicine art and art medicine? Join Chinese medicine practitioners/artists Daniel Hudson, Dr. Henry Wu, Isshaela Ingham, Albert Stern, and Spencer Ames for a day/half-day exploration of topics on Asian medicine and the Asian art on display at the DAM.

Presenters will focus on how the collection reveals traditional medical symbols, imagery and concepts integral to mind/body health in Asian traditions as well as our adaptation of them into our modern life and wellbeing.

Box lunch included in full day and morning session half-day registrations. Registrants will receive a call from our executive assistant to verify their lunch preferences.

Doors open at 9:30 am.

Image above: Tattoos on Cambodian monk. Courtsey of Jessica Peterson.


Full Day Option: 4 lectures, tour and box lunch - $35 Asian Art Association & Denver Art Museum members, $45 others

Half Day Options:

Morning session: 2 lectures (As Seen in Asian Art and Qi Gong & the Art of Healing), tour and box lunch - $25 AAA & DAM members, $35 others

Afternoon session: 2 lectures (Reimagined Medicine and Sak Yant Tattoos) - $15 AAA/DAM members, $25 others

For details, email Beverly Little at blittle@denverartmuseum.org or call 720-913-0040.

Buy tickets online, or call 720-913-0130.

Sponsored by: Asian Art Association and The Yao Clinic.

 

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-Colorado Premiere Cinema Kabuki Showings in Boulder and Denver-

Japan America Society of Colorado is very proud and honored to be facilitating the Colorado Premiere of Cinema Kabuki with English subtitles, thanks to generous support form Japan Foundation Los Angeles and Shochiku Co., Ltd.

Please take this opportunity to enjoy the beauty of Japanese Kabuki theatrical plays with a you-are-there feeling in movie theater. There are two opportunities to watch different kabuki plays; one is in Boulder and the other is in Denver. 

 

Boulder show: "Sagi Musume (Heron Maiden)" 鷺娘

Tuesday, September 13, 2016, 7:30pm  

Admission: Free

Place: Muenzinger Auditorium, University of Colorado Boulder (1905 Colorado Ave. Boulder)

Co-hosted by Center for Asian Studies CU Boulder and Japan America Society of Colorado

About the movie: Featuring Kabuki's greatest female role, this is the classic dance story of Sagi Musume (Heron Maiden): The resentful spirit of a heron, who, having assumed the form of a young woman, falls in unrequited love with a man. Five costume changes take place as, before our eyes, we see the heron take the form of an innocent young girl and then an older and more experienced woman. In the end, she is wounded, and, having resumed the form of a heron, dances out her death throes.

Click here to visit the Japan America Society website for additional details.

 

 


Denver show: "The Tale of Bunshichi" 人情噺 文七元

Tuesday, September 20, 2016, 7:00pm  

Admission: JASC members, students, and seniors - $7.50; General public - $10

Place: Fries Theatre in Sie Film Center (2510 E. Colfax Ave. Denver)

About the movie: Chobei is a very skilled craftsman and has many loyal customers but is about to be broke because of his love of gambling. His daughter Ohisa has decided to help her father by selling herself to the Yoshiwara brothel. The mistress of the brothel was moved by Ohisa's plea and urges Chobei to give up gambling. She lent Chobei the money so he can pay off his debts but says that for the time being, Ohisa will work for a servant, and if Chobei loses the money or spends it gambling, Ohisa will have to be a prostitute. On the way back home with the money, by the river Chobei encounters a young shop clerk about to commit suicide. Chobei tries to persuade him not to die, but the young man called Bunshichi says he has lost the large amount of money he collected for his master and has no choice but to die. Bunshichi lost the exact amount of money that the mistress lent Chobei. So, Chobei, saying that no amount of money can buy a human life, forces Bunshichi to accept the money and runs away.

Click here to visit the Japan America Society website for tickets and for additional details.

 

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John Marshall at the Denver Art Museum

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Sponsored by: Rocky Mountain Weavers' Guild

No charge

 

Meet John with his Japanese textile collection in the Nancy Lake Benson Thread Studio 10-11:30am, 1:30-2:30pm

 

 

12:00pm Lecture - The Discerning Eye: A Collector's Guide to Japanese Textiles

North Building, Lower Level

Join us for a lively discussion with John Marshall as he shares tips and insights for fully appreciating the Japanese textiles in your collection. He will be presenting an amazing array of samples illustrating the many ways to determine which textiles are "real," which are based on an appreciation of the traditional technique, and which are simple fakes intended to deceive. With over forty years of experience in the field of Japanese textiles, John will be sharing a wealth of knowledge to help you in determining which of the limitless range of textiles available on the market will be the best investment for you.

 

3:00pm Informal Lecture: John Marshall Up Close and Personal

North Building, Lower Level

Join John for a casual evaluation of your Japanese textiles. Bring your treasures, and John will help describe what you have and discuss Japanese techniques used and help you to appreciate all that went into imagining and executing them. He will not appraise your pieces nor give precise dates.

 

John Marshall has spent the past forty years immersed in the study of Japanese textiles. He was trained in Japan from the age of seventeen as a traditional katazome dyer specializing in bingata. John has published through Kodansha International and has appeared in such magazines and periodicals as Katei Zenka, Sophia, asahi Shimbun, Shufu-o-tomo, Ornament, Surface Design, Bell Armoire, and Fiber Arts. His work has appeared on NHK and PBS and in exhibitions hosted by the US State Department, The Embassy of Japan, Kodansha, and the Textile Museum in Washington, D.C., to name a few.


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-Curator's Circle and Asian Art Association Lecture Series-

Saturday, September 24, 2016, 6:30pm 

Shifting Forms: Ancient Inspirations in Contemporary Japanese Ceramic Art

Robert Yellin  


What are the connections between ancient and contemporary Japanese ceramics? In this lecture, Robert Yellin, noted author on Japanese ceramics, will present the sources of inspirations for many contemporary Japanese ceramic artists. Focusing on Bizen and Shigaraki, Mr. Yellin will examine how these two old traditions have shaped the new visions and forms in contemporary Japanese ceramic art.

A resident of Japan since 1984, Mr. Yellin is noted columnist on Japanese ceramics to the Japan Times, the largest English newspaper in Japan. He is a member of the Japan Ceramics Society. He has also contributed to DarumaWINDSCeramics Art and PerceptionAsian Art Newspaper, and Honoho Geijutsu, a leading quarterly devoted to contemporary Japanese ceramics. This lecture will be illustrated using images taken by Mr. Yellin over decades of living in and working with ceramists all over Japan.

Image left: Kohyama Yasuhisa 神山易久, b. 1936, Vase, Japan, Ceramic, Collection of Robert and Lisa Kessler
Image right: Courtesy of Tianlong Jiao


Time: 6:30pm, September 24, 2016

Location:  Sharp Auditorium, Hamilton Building, Denver Art Museum

RSVP online or call 720-913-0130

Admission free of charge

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association / Curator's Circle

 

-Curator's Circle and Asian Art Association Lecture Series-

 Wednesday, August 17, 2016, 12-1pm 

Jingdezhen and Hizen: A Comparison of Sino-Japanese Porcelain from Early 17th to Mid-19th Century  

Huan Xiong  

Jingdezhen, China and Hizen, Japan have both been renowned centers of porcelain production since the early 17th century.   Frequent interaction and exchanges between the two production centers resulted in a sharing of styles and methods that can confuse the modern observer.  Dr. Huan Xiong, associate professor at Sun Yat-sen University, will lead us through the four stages of Sino-Japanese porcelain relationships to better recognize the similarities and differences to be found in their beauty.

Huan Xiong, the associate professor of the Department of History at Sun Yat-sen University, received his Ph.D. in Archaeology and Museology from Nankai University of China and in Cultural Heritage from Aichi University of Japan respectively. His current research interests focus on the ceramics of Jingdezhen and the Chinese ceramic trade and exchange globally.

 

Image: Blue and White Vase, 17th Century, Jingdezhen Porcelain, Butler Collection, Shanghai Museum

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 

-Curator's Circle-

Thursday, June 2, 2016,  6:30 pm

The Evolution of Japanese Armor from the Kofun to the Edo Periods

Douglas Wagner  

Curatorial Assistant, Asian art department, DAM

 

The image of the samurai on the battlefield is closely tied to the suits of armor they wore.  Magnificently imposing and beautifully detailed, these works of art were perfectly designed to protect their wearers and convey their authority.  From the introduction of mounted warriors to Japan, through centuries of civil war, and eventually to the emergence of a long era of peace, the changing form of warfare and roles of the samurai required an evolution in armor design.  Mounted archery and individual duels gradually gave way to castle sieges and massed battle formations.  Samurai wielding swords and bows contended with soldiers using spears and muskets, and ultimately armor became a nostalgic status symbol looking back to a glorious past.  This lecture by Douglas Wagner of the Denver Art Museum’s Asian art department will illustrate various types of Japanese armor, explaining the events and forces that drove changes in its appearance, construction and function through more than thirteen centuries.  

 

Douglas Wagner is Curatorial Assistant in the Asian Art Department of the Denver Art Museum. Working at the DAM in many capacities since 1997, he formally began in the Asian art department in 2006 with the exhibition of the Kimiko and John Powers Collection of Japanese Art for the opening of the museum’s Hamilton wing.  Since joining the Asian art department Douglas has been closely involved with the installation and interpretation of its collection, and the development of exhibitions and related programming.  He has written on Japanese art and various Asian art subjects, and was awarded a Japan-US Art Curator Exchange scholarship by the Japan Foundation in 2011.   He has lectured about the samurai at the Denver Art Museum, the University of Colorado, and the University of Denver.  While developing the Denver Art Museum’s exhibition, Samurai: Armor from the Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Collection, Douglas served as the museum’s samurai history and material specialist.

Prior to joining the museum Douglas earned a degree in history and anthropology from the University of Colorado, Denver, where he pursued archaeological field work in Puerto Rico, and history and language studies in Ireland and Germany.  He studied the Japanese language and taught English at Teikyo Loretto Heights in Denver, has practiced various martial disciplines, and explored samurai culture through Kendo, Japanese swordsmanship.

Image above: Armor of the Mogamidō Type
Helmet signed by Hōrai Kunichika, Muromachi period, about 1530;
mask signed by Myōchin Muneaki, Edo period, 1600s–1700s
Iron, lacquer, gold and copper alloy (shakudō), gold, silver, copper, bronze, silk, leather 
T290
© The Ann & Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Museum, Dallas


Time: 6:30pm, June 2nd, 2016

Location:  Sharp Auditorium, Hamilton building, Denver Art Museum

Free Admission with RSVP, Call the number below.

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

Reception:  Art Hotel   12th and Broadway,  4th floor Welcome Gallery and Fire Terrace

Reception Description: 1 free drink, hors d’oureves, visit with speaker.  Immediately following program – 9pm

Host:  Curator’s Circle William Sharpless Jackson Fund

 

 


 

-Wednesday at Noon Lecture-

Wednesday, May 25, 2016, 12-1pm 

Geisha and Concubines

Dr. Hiroko Johnson 

 

What exactly are geisha? Said to inhabit a separate reality called karyūkai or the “flower and willow world”, concubines were the colorful “flowers” and the geisha the “willows” because of their subtlety, strength and grace.  Dr. Hiroko Johnson, Professor Emeritus of Japanese Art History, San Diego State University, will enlighten us about the early origins of geisha and the profession’s rise and fall reflecting the growth and decline of the samurai warrior class.  

 

Dr. Hiroko Johnson is an art historian specializing in Japanese art history. She received a PhD from the University of Southern California and was a post-doctoral fellow at University of Tokyo in Japan. She specializes in Asian art and brought Japanese culture to her students by taking them on annual study tours to Japan. Currently an Emeritus Professor at San Diego State University, she received the Most Outstanding Faculty Member award in 2011. In San Diego she is on the board of the Japanese Friendship Garden and has co-curated the woodblock prints collection of the San Diego Museum of Art. She has numerous publications in both Japanese and English, including a monograph titled "Western Influences on Japanese Art: the Akita Ranga School and Foreign Books" in which she introduced the West to the Akita Ranga Art school, Japan's first art school to apply the Western painting techniques in Japan.


-Curator's Circle-

Tuesday, May 17, 2016, 6:30pm 

Japanese Sword Fittings and the Samurai Tradition

Robert Mintz

 

Central to the identity of the Japanese samurai was the distinctive sword and its elaborate mounts.  This talk by Robert Mintz, Chief Curator, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Quincy Scott Department of Asian art at the Walters Art Museum, will explore the history the Japanese sword and its associated furniture.  The product of advanced technology and masterful artistry practiced by elite metalsmiths, the sword and its trappings served as symbols of power and of identity.  The carefully worked iron surfaces of the tsuba (sword guard), kozuka (utility knife), and other metal accessories served as surfaces for the inscription of a host of Confucian, Buddhist, and native Japanese ideas.   Reception to follow. 

Robert Mintz (Ph.D. University of Washington, 2002) is Chief Curator at the Walters Art Museum. He joined the Walters in 2006 as Assistant Curator of Asian Art with expertise specifically in the study of 18th century Japanese painting.  While at the Walters he has developed exhibitions and installations exploring points of intersection between Eastern and Western art, 18th century Japanese painting, Japanese decorative arts, modern woodblock prints, and contemporary art from India, Thailand, Japan and China.  While exploring the wide range of subjects included in these exhibitions, his primary focus has been the collections of Asian art housed at the Walters.  With the reinstallation of these collections on the immediate horizon, recent months have been spent researching and cataloguing the Walters holdings of East Asian ceramics, arms and armor, works on paper, lacquer, and other media.  

Prior to joining the Walters Rob taught courses in the history of Asian art at the University of Washington, served on the faculty of Seattle University as lecturer in art history and director of the Kinsey Art Gallery, and taught on the faculty of Central Washington University. Carrying forward his interest in teaching and learning, he has in recent years taught regularly for the Johns Hopkins University and for Towson University in addition to lecturing widely on the East Coast and in Japan.

 

Time: 6:30pm, May 17, 2016

Location:  

Sharp Auditorium, Hamilton building, Denver Art Museum

Free Admission with RSVP before 4pm, May 7, Call the number below or click here.

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 

 

-Wednesday at Noon Lecture-

Wednesday, April 6, 2016, 12-1pm 

From Ink to Stickers: Contemporary Tibetan Artist Gonkar Gyatso

Gonkar Gyatso

 

Gonkar Gyatso will discuss his work as it has evolved from his formal training in brush painting in China to the influence of pop culture and street art in the West. Identity, politics, humor and aesthetics have all played a central role in Gyatso's work and he will discuss these themes in relation to his body of "Buddha" work, photography and most recently abstraction. 

Gonkar Gyatso is a Tibetan born artist, living and working between China and London.  Gyatso trained in Chinese Brush painting in Beijing, Thangka painting in India and Fine Arts at the Chelsea School of Art and Design in London. His work has been exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art ( New York, NY) and The Museum of Fine Arts (Boston, MA); in addition, Gonkar participated in the the 53rd Venice Biennial (Italy), the 6th Asia Pacific Triennial in Brisbane (Australia) and the 17th Sydney Biennale (Australia). 

Image: Shamble of Modern Times, 2008, 219 x 200 cm, stickers, paper collage, pencil and ink on treated fine art paper, Courtesy of the artist


Time: 12-1pm, April 6, 2016

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Building, Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 

-Wednesday at Noon Lecture-

Wednesday, March 16, 2016, 12-1pm 

Rethinking Yuan Ink Painting and Calligraphy 

Kealey Boyd 

 

The content and intrinsic meaning of landscape painting changed abruptly in the Yuan dynasty of China. How do art historians reconcile a period style described as both classic and revolutionary?

Yuan dynasty painter and calligrapher Ni Zan produced the Manual of Sketches in 1350. Within its ten pages of sketches and instruction, the Manual provides evidence that Ni Zan’s method of learning to paint was guided by the pedagogy of calligraphy.  In this talk, we will explore the ideologies of a Yuan master and how and if they contribute to understanding Yuan dynastic style.

 

Kealey Boyd is a lecturer in Art History at Metro State University of Denver. She earned her B.A. in Economics and M.A. in Art History from the University of Chicago and completed post-graduate study at Tsinghua University in Beijing. Her research interests include Yuan dynasty painting and calligraphy, and methodologies for interpreting painting and other visual forms, as an integral element of Chinese political and cultural discourses.

Image above: Ni Zan. Wind Among Trees on Riverbank. 1363. Hanging scroll, ink on paper. 59.1 x 31.1 cm. Bequest of John M. Crawford, Jr.  Wen Fong and Metropolitan Museum of Art, Beyond Representation: Chinese Painting and Calligraphy, 8th-14th Century, (New York; New Haven: Metropolitan Museum of Art; Yale University Press, 1992), 488.

Image below: Ni Zan. Manual of Sketches (third leaf). 1350. Album leaf, ink on paper. 23.6 x 14.2 cm. National Palace Museum, Taipei.  A Panorama of Paintings in the Collection of the National Place Museum, (Taipei, National Palace Museum, 1993; 1995), 102-10.


Time: 12-1pm,  March 16, 2016

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Building, Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 


-Wednesday at Noon Lecture-

Wednesday, February 17, 2016, 12-1pm 

The Art of Tibetan Woodblock Printing

Benjamin Nourse

 

This talk will explore the world of Tibetan printed books, from the production of hand-carved printing blocks to the various printing styles that emerged among the great Tibetan printing centers. We will also look at examples of non-book uses of printing in Tibet, such as printed talismans, ritual implements, and artistic prints. Drawing from Dr. Nourse's research at Tibetan printing houses and in rare Tibetan book collections, the lecture will showcase some of the artistry and the diversity of woodblock printing in Tibet.

Benjamin J. Nourse is a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Denver where he teaches courses on Asian religious traditions. His research focuses on the production and use of religious books in Buddhist cultures and he is currently working on a study of the growth of Tibetan religious publishing in the eighteenth century.

Image: Bstan pa spyi dang rgyud sde bzhi'i rnam gzhag zin bris su byas pa, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia.


Time: 12-1pm, February 17, 2016

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Building, Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 


-Patron Event and Private Tour-

Thursday October 8, 2015, 4:30-6pm 

A New Fine Line 

Julie Segraves

 

The Asian Art Association will be hosting a private event on October 8, 2015 for its Patron level members at the Metro Center for Visual Arts. Patron members will be given a private tour of A New Fine Line: Contemporary Ink Painting from China lead by curator and organizer Julie Segraves. 

 

Time: 4:30-6pm, Thursday October 8, 2015

Location:  CENTER FOR VISUAL ARTS , METROPOLITAN STATE UNIVERSITY OF DENVER, 965 Sante Fe Drive, Denver, CO 

 

RSVP required, Deadline for RSVP : Friday, October 2, 2015

Admission Fees:  Free to all AAA Patron level members (Patron level member include; Bronze, Silver, Gold members and Board members.)

RSVP to Beverly Little by Friday, October 2nd, 2015

Tel: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 

-Wednesday at Noon Lecture-

Wednesday, October 21, 2015, 12-1pm 

Contemporary Tibetan Art

Tenzing Rigdol 

 

Contemporary Tibetan art is a quickly rising field of interest for art collectors, scholars, and the public alike.  In 2014, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City acquired its first contemporary Tibetan work from artist Tenzin Rigdol.  Rigdol’s output in the past decade includes paintings, collage, and an installation project in India that was documented in the 2014 film “Bringing Tibet Home.”  For this lecture, Rigdol will be discussing his art and its relation to Tibetan traditions and struggles.

Tenzing Rigdol is a contemporary Tibetan artist and published poet. He has exhibited his artworks extensively throughout museums and galleries around the world including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the Rubin Museum of Art, and the Queens Museum in addition to solo shows in London and Singapore.  

Image: Tenzing Rigdol, Afloat, 2014 (Collage, silk brocade, and scripture)


Time: 12-1pm, October 21, 2015

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Building, Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 


- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 12-1pm 

Last Empress in Qipaos from Manchu to China Chic

 Sally Yu Leung

 

Designers capitalized on the romantic nostalgia of Shanghai with a modern-day interpretation of the qipao (Mandarin gown) with the help of bright colors and patterns.  Ironically what once was considered a peripheral and bourgeois item has now taken center stage and become a global fashion icon.

Gobulo Wanrong was born November 13, 1906, during the turbulent time of the Qing empire.  At the age of sixteen, she married Emperor Xuantong (Aisin-Gioro Puyi) who was the last emperor of China.  In spite of being an opium addict and the scandal that surrounded her marriage to Emperor Puyi, Empress Wanrong was known for both her modernity and her unerring sense of style in qipao.  She had a star quality about her that seemed few people at the time naturally possessed.  Since her death at the age of thirty-nine, Empress Wanrong’s style can still wow a generation of women today in the twenty-first century. 

In this talk, we will explore the origins and modern-day interpretation of the qipao through the Last Empress Wanrong.

 

Sally Yu Leung is an independent lecturer, author and curator of Chinese decorative arts.  From 1983-2000, she was a board member of the Chinese American International School.  She assumed the role of Chinese culture and brush art instructor for Pixar Animation Studios since 2001.  From 2007 till present, she is a guest instructor of Denver Botanic Gardens’ Certificate in Botanical Art and Illustration Program.  She is the consultant and chief designer of the Interior Cultural Enhancement Project for the International School of Beijing at Shunyi, China.  In 2005 she was the recipient of the Woman Warrior Award in the Arts.  From 1999-2009, she served as a commissioner for the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco.  In June 2012 she was listed in the Chinese Ministry of Culture’s Hall of Fame of those who contributed to the protection and preservation of Chinese cultural heritage. 

Photo: Above - Last Emperor Puyi and Last Empress Wanrong (courtesy of Prof. Wang Qingxiang), Below - Photo of Sally Yu Leung (courtesy of Frank Wing)



Time: 12-1pm, September 30, 2015

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Building, Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 

 


- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

Wednesday, July 22, 2015, 12-1:15pm 

Focus on the Lotus and other Plants in Asian Art

Kathleen Keeler

 

Join Dr. Kathy Keeler, Professor Emerita University Of Nebraska, School of Biological Sciences, aka The Wandering Botanist, in an exploration of the plants and flowers found in Asian art.  This lecture and tour of the Asian galleries (with a self-guided tour of the other Asian pieces found in the museum-wide focus on blooming plants in 19th Century art) will touch on identification and meaning to be found in the lotus, chrysanthemum, peony, and other important plants in Asian art.  A world traveler and author of several books on plants from the Amazon to Colorado, Dr Keeler is a font of information of things that bloom.  Reserve early: tour spaces limited to first 25 registrations.

At University of Nebraska, Kathy taught general ecology to non-science majors (and science majors), economic botany (about economically important plants), prairie ecology, general biology and more.  Traveling extensively in retirement on art-intensive tours with husband Karl Anderson,  Kathy brought experience of 40 years of studying plants; recognizing common useful plants, their history, dye plants, sources of fibers ,gums and many medicinals,  the history of crop development and movement of plants around the world.  In her travels she has produced A Checklist of Amazon Plants while on a Smithsonian tour of the Peruvian Amazon, 11 Common Plants of Devil’s Backbone Natural Area for the Loveland Visitors Center, Driving I-76 and I-80, Crossing Eastern Colorado and Nebraska  (changes you can see from the car at 75 mp) and several short videos available on her website, awanderingbotanist.com.

Photo: Above - Kathleen Keeler, Below - Tray, Japan, Edo period (19th century); wood, lacquer, Denver Art Museum: Gift of Mr. & Mrs. George A. Argabrite 1977.108 (detail)


Time: 12-1:15pm, July 22, 2015

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room & 5th floor galleries, North Building, Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 

June 12, 2015, 10:30am-3:30pm

Union with the Divine: The Art History of Yoga at the Denver Art Museum

Sarah Magnatta, Barbara Kelly, Marty Corren, Kristin Fong

 

Docent Tours, Lecture and Yoga Class

10:30–11:45 AM   Yoga class led by Kristin Fong in Schlessman Hall, Ground Floor, North Bldg

12:00 PM   Lecture given by Dr. Sarah Magnatta of the University of Denver, Asian Studies Dept. in Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg

 

1–2 PM   Light Refreshments at Mad Greens

2 PM*   Indian Folk Art Tour given by Marty Corren, 5th Floor, North Bldg

2 PM*   Classical Indian Art Tour given by Barbara Kelly, 5th Floor, North Bldg  

(*NOTE – Docent tour switch groups at 2:30pm)

 

Photo: God Shiva, Lord of the Dance (Nataraja), South India, Tamil Nadu, 1100s, Chola dynasty, Bronze, Denver Art Museum: Dora Porter Mason Collection, 1947.2 

 

Time: 10:30am-3:30pm, June 12, 2015

Location:  Galleries, Lecture Room, Lower Level, and Schlessman Hall, North Building, Denver Art Museum

RSVP required. Deadline for RSVP :  June 2, 2015  Max: 50, call or email 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Admission Fees:  AAA members $15, Other DAM members $25, General Public $25

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

May 6, 2015,  12-1pm

Reconstructing the All-Knowing Buddha

Dr Karl Debreczeny

 

Karl Debreczeny, senior curator at the Rubin Museum of Art, will lead the audience through a visual analysis of a set of 54 paintings obtained in 1923 in “Eastern Mongolia” by a Belgian missionary. Unknown to the missionary they illustrate visualization, a creative meditative process that otherwise occurs only in the mind’s eye. This beautifully illustrated step-by-step guide to this practice thus provides a unique view of Tibetan Buddhist meditation and ritual, normally instruction restricted to oral transmission and not meant to be depicted. While the ritual narrative of these unusual paintings is Tibetan Buddhist in content, they are expressed in a vivid Chinese aesthetic, a product of cultural translation through its Mongolian patrons, which resulted in this extraordinary imagery.

Image: All-Knowing Buddha Vairocana Album Leaf (from a set of fifty-four paintings), Wangzimiao, Aokhan Banner, Inner Mongolia; ca. late 18th–19th century, Pigments on paper, MAS | Museum aan de Stroom, Antwerp (Belgium) AE.1977.0026.035

 

Time: 12-1pm, May 6, 2015

Location:  Lower lecture room, North Building, Denver Art Museum

RSVP required. RSVP online: www.tickets.denverartmuseum.org, call 720-913-0130 or at Welcome Desk at DAM 

Admission Fees:  AAA members Free, Students, Docents, Teachers $5, Other DAM members $7, General Public $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association


March 20, 2015  Reception 5:30pm, Talk: 6:30pm

From the Shadows of Wartime:Three Japanese American Artists

Dr. Barabara Johns  

 

Little more than two months after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, fear and racist propaganda culminated in Executive Order 9066, which enabled the forced removal of 110,000 people of Japanese descent from the West Coast. Little more than two months later they were gone. In Seattle this included the respected modernist painters Kenjiro Nomura, Kamekichi Tokita, and Takuichi Fujii. All three were incarcerated at the Minidoka Relocation Center in Idaho, where each left an eloquent record of his experience. Until recently their names were largely forgotten, their accomplishments overlooked. In an illustrated talk, Dr. Johns discusses her work in reclaiming the artists’ stories and demonstrating their place in American art history.

Self portrait of the artist, Kamekichi Tokita.  Image courtesy of Barbara Johns from her book “Signs of Home: The Paintings and Wartime Diary of Kamekichi Tokita”  University of Washington Press, 2011

 

Time: March 20, 2015,  Reception 5:30pm, Talk: 6:30pm

Location:  Sharp Lobby and Auditorium, Hamilton Building

               Denver Art Museum

RSVP required. RSVP online: www.tickets.denverartmuseum.org, call 720-913-0130 or at Welcome Desk at DAM Deadline for RSVP :  March 18, 2015

Admission Fees:  Free to all

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  The Japan Foundation, AAA

 

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

Wednesday, February 25, 2015, 12-1pm 

Tibetan Contemporary Art 

Tsherin Sherpa 

 

Born in Kathmandu, Nepal, Tsherin Sherpa studied traditional Tibetan thangka painting from age 12, with a short foray to Taiwan to study Mandarin and Computer Science in his 20’s.  After his return to Nepal and subsequent move to the US in 1998, Tsherin continued working and teaching as a thangka artist, but in recent years has explored the detachment experience caused by the Tibetan Diaspora in relation to the traditional art.  His classical images of Tibetan deities morph into a swirling abstract form that illustrates this sense of groundlessness.

Photo: Image courtesy of Tsherin Sherpa    B1.Sherpa 2-25-15.tif   “Multiple Protectors (Blue)  2014”  Gold leaf, acrylic and ink on paper.

 

Time: 12-1pm, February 25, 2015

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg.,

Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 


- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

Wednesday, January 21, 2015, 12-1pm 

Embracing Ryoan-ji 

Andrew Svedlow

 

This presentation inquires into the history of the revered rock garden at the Ryoan-ji Temple located in Kyoto, Japan and the aesthetics which underlie this iconic stone garden.  The purpose is to unfold the significant connections between aesthetic theories at the time of the creation of the garden and the resonation of those ideas in providing some insight into a contemporary sensibility about nature, art, and the place of contemplation in the aesthetic experience.  The austerity and simplicity of the Zen rock garden, as exemplified by the dry landscape at Ryoan-ji, will be detailed as well as the historical antecedents and religious context of this particular garden.  A discussion of the milieu of the garden in the culture of 15th, 16th, and 17th century Kyoto will place Ryoan-ji in the context of Japanese art history in general, as well as in the specifics of Rinzai Buddhist iconography and Zen Buddhist aesthetics.

Photo credit: Andrew Svedlow

 

Professor of Art History and formerly Dean of the College of Performing and Visual Arts at the University of Northern Colorado, Dr. Svedlow was previously the Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Winthrop University, President of the New Hampshire Institute of Art, and Assistant Director of the Museum of the City of New York.  Dr. Svedlow received his Ph.D. from the Pennsylvania State University and has taught art education, museum education, art history, arts administration, aesthetics, and studio art at Northern Colorado, Winthrop University, Penn State, Bank Street College of Education, Parsons School of Design, University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth and Lowell, University of Kansas, New York University, University of Southern Mississippi, the New Hampshire Institute of Art, and the University of New Hampshire. He was a 2007 Fulbright Scholar for the Japan-US International Education program and was a 2010 Fulbright Scholar to Ukraine. 

Professor Svedlow has published on aesthetics, art history, art education, museum education, and arts administration.  His publications include articles on lifelong learning, reveries on aesthetics, and the history of art museums in America.  Currently in press is his essay, Hegel and The Sea of Ice and his textbook “Thirty Works of Art Every Student Should Know” with Kendall Hunt Publishers is due out January 2015.  His art criticism has appeared in such journals as American Artist, the New Art Examiner, and the Kansas Quarterly. He recently wrote a chapter on Japanese aesthetics for the book, Teaching Asian Art published by NAEA in 2012.


Doors open at 11:30 am.

 

Time: 12-1pm, January 21, 2015

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg.,

Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

Wednesday, November 12th 2014, 12-1pm 

Plants in Chinese Art

Kathleen Keeler

 

China has a very large number of native plants but only a limited number of these plants appear in traditional Chinese art. The conventions for including plants in traditional Chinese art were very different from the conventions of traditional European art. The symbolism the viewer is expected to understand when viewing plants in Chinese art can be quite different from that of the same plant in a European or American painting. More recent Chinese art is uses more diverse plants. Examples will be drawn from the DAM’s collection.

At University of Nebraska, Kathy taught general ecology to non-science majors (and science majors), economic botany (about economically important plants), prairie ecology, general biology and more.  Traveling extensively in retirement on art-intensive tours with husband Karl Anderson,  Kathy brought experience of 40 years of studying plants; recognizing common useful plants, their history, dye plants, sources of fibers ,gums and many medicinals,  the history of crop development and movement of plants around the world.  In her travels she has produced A Checklist of Amazon Plants while on a Smithsonian tour of the Peruvian Amazon, 11 Common Plants of Devil’s Backbone Natural Area for the Loveland Visitors Center, Driving I-76 and I-80, Crossing Eastern Colorado and Nebraska  (changes you can see from the car at 75 mp) and several short videos available on her website, awanderingbotanist.com.

Photo: by Kathleen Keeler


Time: 12-1pm, November 12th, 2014

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg.,

Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

Wednesday, October 15 2014, 12-1pm 

Excavating Thailand: the Search for a Prehistoric Bronze Age

Vincent C. Pigott

 

This lecture focuses on the remarkable evidence for making metal excavated by the speaker and his team in central Thailand, just north of Bangkok, where a pair of unique, prehistoric villages together comprise one of the largest regional copper production centers known anywhere in eastern Asia. From where did this all-important technology come - from India  - from China - or perhaps beyond?

Dr. Vincent C. Pigott is currently a Consulting Scholar in the Asian Section, University of Pennsylvania Museum in Philadelphia and resides here in the Denver area. He holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from Penn and, as an archaeologist, is focused on the prehistory and archaeometallurgy of Mainland Southeast Asia. He maintains a strong interest in the origins, transmission and societal impact of metallurgy across Eurasia and it is in this context that he continues to expand his research into the reciprocal interactions of technology and culture. 

Photo top: The Pinnacle at Phu Lon Copper mine, NE Thailand  ca. 1000bc  Courtesy V. C. Pigott.

 

Time: 12-1pm, October 15, 2014

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg.,

Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association


Friday, October 3rd 2014, 12-1pm 

Bencharong – Royal Porcelain of Siam

Paul Bromberg

 

There has until recently been little published in English or Thai about Bencharong, yet it was made in China in the 18th and early 19th centuries exclusively for Siamese royalty. In his presentation, Paul Bromberg will explore the history, production, usage and forms of this little-known, yet vibrant and colorful, export ceramic ware, drawing on examples from his own collection and the Ring Collection in Oslo, Norway, the largest repository of Bencharong outside Thailand which was the subject of a recent exhibition and accompanying catalog written by a team of twelve well-known international scholars.

Paul Bromberg is the serving editor of the Journal of the Siam Society and a contributing editor to Arts of Asiamagazine. He writes and lectures regularly about Thai art and antiques. He has been living in Asia since 1985, and resident in Bangkok since 1997. He read Modern Chinese Studies at the University of Leeds, and also studied at Fudan University, Shanghai and Xiamen University, Fujian Province, China. He was an editorial advisor to Bencharong & Chinaware  in the Court of Siam: The Surat Osathanugrah Collection, published by Chawpipope Osathanugrah, Bangkok, 2011 and a contributing author to Royal Porcelain from Siam: Unpacking the Ring Collection, published by Hermes Publishing, Oslo, 2013.

Photo top: by Eddie Siu. Courtesy of Paul Bromberg

Photo right: by Kirsten J. Helgeland. Courtesy of Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo


Time: 12-1pm, October 3rd, 2014

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg.,

Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

Wednesday, September 24th 2014, 12-1pm 

Yatai by Any Other Name is Dashi

Kitty Comstock

 

Denver Sister Cities International former Committee Chair for the restoration of Denver’s Yatai, Kitty Comstock, will provide an informative talk about the history of Yatai/Dashi, and how one came to live in Sakura Square.  Most commonly known in Japan as street food carts where the first sushi was sold in the 1700s, Yatai have evolved into festival floats, more usually now called Dashi, embodying great civic pride and expensive upkeep.

Kitty and husband Steve joined Denver Sister Cities in 1994, specifically interested in the Denver / Takayama, Japan Sister City. They have both led groups of students to Japan for the High School Student Exchange Program which the committee started in 1983. Kitty served as chair of the Denver / Takayama Committee in 2000-2001and Steve is currently serving as the Chair.

During Kitty’s term as committee chair, she oversaw the restoration of the Yatai that was given to the city of Denver in 1964 and which is housed in a glass case in Sakura Square in downtown Denver. 


Time: 12-1pm, September 24th, 2014

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg.,

Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

Curator's Circle - Thursday, May 29, 2014, 7-8 pm

A Creative Impulse—Rabindranath Tagore, the Nobel-Laureate Poet, Musician, and Painter from India

 Sharmila Roy Pommot

Hamilton Building, Lower Level
 
Reception
MAD Beans & Wine Cafe
Acoma Plaza  8–9 pm 
Lecture and reception are free.
Reservations required; please email dbryant@denverartmuseum.org to RSVP. 
Event sponsored by the William Sharpless Jackson Jr. Endowment

 

 

Wednesday, May 14th 2014, 12-1pm 

Art, Ritual and Identity in Modern Bhutan

Ariana Maki

 

In the world of Asian art history, the Himalayan nation of Bhutan is comparatively understudied and often misrepresented as a minor offshoot of its better known neighbors, Tibet, Nepal and India.  This talk draws upon my research and experiences studying Bhutanese art in situ since 2007, and seeks to demonstrate some of its unique stylistic characteristics as well as its uses in rituals and everyday life. In addition, we’ll explore how art objects are used to define and sustain identity in Bhutan at the local and national levels.

We will also consider some of the challenges currently facing the nation’s material and visual culture, which is caught between the past and present in significant and challenging ways. With Bhutan’s newly instituted democracy, an explosion of technological advances, and half its population under the age of 24, how can the relics and rituals of the historical past compete and stay relevant?  With annual tourism projected to top 100,000 visitors in the next ten years, how can cultural commodification be avoided? This talk will address these and other questions about art, identity and ritual in the world’s only Vajrayana Buddhist country. 

Ariana Maki is a specialist in Buddhist art and iconography, and earned her Ph.D. in Art History from Ohio State University. She is currently Associate Curator of Asian Art at the CU Art Museum, University of Colorado Boulder, as well as a researcher at the National Library and Archives of Bhutan, Thimphu and Assistant Curator at Himalayan Art Resources.

Ariana's research interests include Buddhist art in ritual practice, the development of Himalayan visual arts, and the intersections of texts, politics and visual representations. Ariana has undertaken field research in India, Nepal, and Tibet, and has been conducting ongoing research in Bhutan since 2007. She volunteered with the National Museum of Bhutan between 2009 and 2011, and has co-authored and edited a forthcoming catalog of their collection, entitled Treasures from the Watchtower. 


Time: 12-1pm, May 14th, 2014

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg.,

Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association


 

Friday-Sunday, May 2-4 2014, 10am-4:30pm 

Splash Ink with Watercolor :

Looking East, Painting West with Ming Franz - Three day workshop

"Splash Ink with Watercolor" is a blending of Asian black ink and primary watercolors splashed onto layers of Ma (mulberry)or Pi papers, adding finishing touches from both Eastern and Western traditions. Blending black ink and watercolors produces an abstract which can be variously interpreted. Often the artist must look at the abstract forms and let the colors speak. The creativity is in the mind of the artist. This innovative style of painting expresses an exceptional and contemporary view of nature.  Artists can allow themselves to let go of control and enjoy this method of creativity. It is about freedom, creativity and your imagination.

Ming Franz began painting as an eight year old, studying with a neighbor, Mr. Tsai, in Taiwan. She studied with masters of traditional Chinese painting and attended National Art Institute of Taiwan, immigrated in the early 70’s, and continued her art studies at various schools around the U.S.  In the early 90’s, Ming fell in love with the technique of splash ink painting as perfected by Master Chang Dai-Chang and studied with Master Paul Hau, Master Chang’s student and friend.  In Ming’s eyes, splash ink painting is all about freedom, creativity, and imagination: each page of splashed and melded paint forms the background of a painting seen in the artist’s interpretation of the forms and color created.

 

Photo top: ©Ming Franz, Iao Valley, Maui 

Photo right:  Ming Franz


Time: Friday-Sunday, May 2-4 2014, 10am-4:30pm 

Location:  North Art Studio and Classroom,

Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members $275 + $30 materials fee paid directly to teacher,

Materials list available, contact Beverly.

Students/ Teachers   $300

DAM members  $300

General Public  $325

$50 non-refundable deposit to hold place in the class.          

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

Wednesday April 16, 12-1pm 

Imagination and Fantasy Flourishing in Prehistoric Jōmon Culture

Hikaru Hirata-Miyakawa

The history of art reflects the evolution of human consciousness.  Prehistoric cave paintings and figurines show the consciousness of the people who were wishing to invoke power and certain qualities of nature in order to imbue themselves with such power and qualities.  One can observe the similar invocation and the embodiment (imbuement) in the art/artifacts of Jōmon (縄文) era (14,500BC to about 300BC) in Japan.  The art of Jōmon culture is filled with powerful imagination and fantasy, no less imaginative than its contemporary counterparts in the west.  Well known teacher and artist Hikaru Hirata-Miyakawa will also share how this prehistoric Japanese culture has been influencing his art.

Descendant from distinguished artisans and educators of Japan, Hikaru began his training in art, music and writing when he was four years old.  As his idol, Leonardo da Vinci, was a man of many talents, so Hiraku strives to express himself in many ways; classical, Mannerist, figuratively, abstractly, assemblage sculpture covered in paper (hariko method)—sometimes simultaneously.  His art has been shown worldwide, his portfolio is on file at the Louvre, and he is included in the first edition of Encyclopedia of the Fantastic Artist  (translation from the German) along with Salvador Dali, and Francis Bacon.

Photo top: from wikipedia


Time: 12-1pm, April 16, 2014

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg.,

Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

Wednesday March 12, 2014 11:30- 2:30pm

Union with the Divine: The Art History of Yoga at the Denver Art Museum

Sarah Magnatta, Marty Corren, Barbara Kelly, Kristin Bonk Fong

Sarah Magnatta, Associate Professor at the University of Denver

Marty Corren, DAM docent

Barbara Kelly, DAM docent

Kristin Bonk Fong, yoga instructor

 

Docent Tours, Lecture and Yoga Class

11:30 am - Indian Folk Art Tour given by Marty Corren, 5th Floor, Ponti Building

12:00 pm - Lecture given by Sarah Magnatta of the University of Denver, Asian Studies Dept. in Lower Level Lecture Room, Ponti Building

1:00 pm – Classical Indian Art Tour given by Barbara Kelly, 5th Floor, Ponti Building

1:30 - Yoga class led by Kristin Bonk Fong in Schlessman Hall, Ground Floor, Ponti Building

 

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture. RSVP by March 5, 2014.

Asian Art Association members  $10

Students/ Teachers   $20

DAM members $20

General Public  $20

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 

Wednesday February 19, 12-1pm 

Jingdezhen:  China's Porcelain Capital 
Through the Ages

Tom Whitten

 

Jingdezhen, in Jiangxi province, took its name from the Jingde reign period of the Northern Song dynasty's Zhao Heng emperor in 1004 CE, when ceramic production there was at one of its many peaks. A millennium of dynastic and political change has proven the resilience of the local industry. One third of the population is estimated still to be working in some form of ceramic business.  This talk investigates the evolution of the ceramics industry in the city and its development up to the present, when the demise of the state-run factory system has opened up opportunities for contemporary artists, craftspeople and makers of high-quality reproductions alike.

Tom Whitten was a resident of China during the 1980's and 90's. He graduated with a BA from the Department of Chinese Studies at the University of Leeds, and a language diploma from Fudan University, Shanghai. He travels to China regularly to manage business interests there, and to pursue his studies of contemporary Chinese art.

Photo top: provided by Tom Whitten

Photo right:  Tom and Michelle Whitten in their home


Time: 12-1pm, February 19, 2014

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg.,

Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

https://tickets.denverartmuseum.org/selection.aspx?item=1015  

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 

Wednesday January 22, 7-8pm

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH DAM CONTEMPORARIES

Spraycan Jihad: Arabic Calligraphy for the Urban Wall

Safa Samiezade-Yazd

 

Safa Samiezade-Yazd, Arts, Music and Culture Editor for Alsan Media, an online youth-driven media source providing alternative coverage of the Middle East and its global diaspora communities,  holds a B.A. from the University of Denver and an MFA in Interdisciplinary Art from Goddard College, in Middle Eastern art and culture, relational and community-driven art, and performance and intercultural studies. 

Spraycan Jihad: Arabic Calligraphy for the Urban Wall is a brief intro into the world of Arabic calligraphy, graffiti writing, street art and urban culture, and the artists, graffiti writers and typographers who keep the tradition alive. In addition to featuring a wide array of photos documenting Arabic graffiti and street art styles, this presentation also explores the traditional elements, modern approaches, and socio-political and cultural contexts that have shaped Arabic graffiti movements throughout the Middle East.

Photo top: Wall Art Inspiration, Hest 1 and eL Seed, Jacksonallers.files.wordpress.com

Photo right:  Dennis Bocquet taken in Tunis  Creative Commons license through fliker

 

Time: 7-8pm, January 22, 2014

doors open at 6:15pm

Location:  Sharp Auditorium, Lower Level, Hamilton Bldg., Denver Art Museum

Tickets:  online at www.denverartmuseum.org  Things to Do/Calendar (search by date and name) or dial 720-913-0130 after November 30.  Reservation required.

Asian Art Association members & DAM Contemporaries members:  $10

Students/ Teachers   $12

DAM members $12

General Public  $15

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org 

or  720-913-0152    jbrunecky@denverartmuseum.org 

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association & DAM Contemporaries

 

Wednesday November 13th, 12pm

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

How Western Culture influenced Japanese art

Hiroko Johnson

Christian art was first brought to Japan during the sixteenth century; however, its impact was minimal as the bakufu (the military controlled government) forbade the propagation of Christianity.  A century later, the bakufu lifted the decree restricting the import of foreign books, though books related to Christianity were still forbidden. A special interest in science books and in Dutch Learning (Rangaku) subsequently developed, and thus was born a quasi-Western painting style in Japan.

Currently Professor Emeritus at San Diego State University, Hiroko Johnson was educated in the University of Tokyo, Japan, and California State University, Northridge before completing her Ph.D. at the University of Southern California and Post-Doctorate Fellowship at the University of Tokyo.

She has been Professor of Art History at San Diego State University since 2000, and in 2011 received Outstanding Faculty honor.

Hiroko Johnson has been much published particularly on the subjects of Japanese prints and the foreign influences on Japanese painting. Her involvements in exhibitions include most recently co-curating Dreams and Diversions at San Diego Museum of Art, which opened on November 7, 2010.

Photo top: The Shinobazu Pond by Odano Naotake (1749-1780), color on silk, 98.5 x 132 cm., collection of the Akita Prefectural Museum

photo right: Heron by Odano Naotake (1749-1780), color on silk, 107.0 x 49.5 cm., collection of Private collector

 

Time:  12noon - 1pm

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg.,

Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

Wednesday October 16th, 12pm

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

Portraits of the Dalai Lamas in Tibet and Beyond

Sarah Magnatta

The current Dalai Lama is one of the world’s most recognizable religious figures.  He is known by many as the exiled Buddhist leader of Tibet; others simply understand that he is a man of great wisdom. Tenzin Gyatso is actually the fourteenth in a lineage of spiritual teachers who were (and are) recognized as incarnations of an enlightened being, Avalokiteśvara.  This lecture will explore portraiture of these teachers in Tibet and will discuss how different audiences, media, and contexts for the Fourteenth Dalai Lama's image coincide with the leader’s shifting role in the political, social, and religious spheres.

 

Doctoral work in Art History at The Ohio State University (focus on Tibetan art history).  ABD Status.  Dissertation research: “Imaging the Dalai Lama: Incarnations in Art and Practice.” Published article in the Stanford Journal of East Asian Affairs: “Forbidden Image: The 1996 Chinese Ban on Imagery of the Fourteenth Dalai Lama.”         

MA Art History, University of Denver (2005)

Currently teaching Asian Art courses for the University of Denver

Photo top: Third Dalai Lama, 19th century Tibetan thangka (mineral pigment on cotton), 58.42 x 39.37cm, collection of the Rubin Museum of Art

Photo right: Seventh Dalai Lama, 18th century Tibet, gilded bronze, H. 19cm, collection of Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art

 

Time:  12noon - 1pm

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg.,

Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

Wednesday September 11th, at 12pm

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

The Iraq National Museum – Rehabilitation and Re-opening 

Dr Gordon Davis

Dr. Davis was Director of the Iraq Cultural Heritage Project in Baghdad between 2009 and 2011. His talk will focus on the repair and renovation of the Iraq National Museum, reopening of the Museum's eleven galleries, relocation of world famous collections to modern collection storage, and the process of capacity building for museum and archaeology professionals in Iraq.

Gordon Davis, a museum consultant, has been former director of museums at Illinois State University and Wichita State University where he was also in charge of the museum studies programs, executive director of the Aurora History Museum, senior advisor for the Bahrain National Museum (Kingdom of Bahrain), has worked with museums in Africa, and was Director of the Iraq Cultural Heritage Project, Baghdad (2009-2011). Davis holds a masters and doctorate from Indiana University, Bloomington.

Photo top: Iraq National Museum entrance, photo right: Iraq National Museum gallery

 

Time:  12noon - 1pm

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg.,

Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 July 19, 2012
- Curator's Circle Lecture -
Collecting Islamic Art - The Gifts of BJ Averitt
Eleanor Sims
The Denver Art Museum is renowned for many of its collections, but few people realize that it owes the existence of its small but distinguished collection of Islamic art in large part to the generous, thoughtful support of a most remarkable Denver resident, Bj Averitt (born July 19, 1922). The numerous Islamic objects acquired for the museum by Bj over several decades are a splendid distillation of Muslim life. They range from sacred objects such as a manuscript of the Qur’an and a mihrab, or prayer-niche, to the mundane and useful, like a chair and articles of clothing. They span the tenth to twentieth centuries and come from Syria, Egypt, Turkey, Iraq, Iran, India, Indonesia, and China. Many of the works are decorated with the geometric patterns, vegetal and floral designs, and Arabic script characteristic of traditional Muslim art, and others feature living beings, composite creatures, and purely imaginary beasts like the dragon. Eleanor Sims, a renowned scholar of Islamic art and friend of Bj Averitt, will speak about this remarkable donor’s legacy at the Denver Art Museum.

Eleanor Sims was educated at Mills College, earned her MA and PhD at the Institute of Fine Arts (IFA), New York University, and holds a museum training certificate issued jointly by the Metropolitan Museum of Art (MMA) and IFA. She worked in the MMA’s Islamic art department and was a research associate with IsMEO (Istituto Italiano per il Medio ed Estremo Oriente) in Iran between 1973 and 1978. From 1978 to 1983, she taught at the Universities of Minnesota and Pennsylvania, reinstalled the Islamic art galleries of the Minneapolis Institute of Art, and organized a traveling exhibition of Islamic art. During this time, she met Bj Averitt, then a staff aide in the Asian art department of the Denver Art Museum. Since 1980, Sims has served as vice-president of the East-West Foundation and editor of the journal Islamic Art. She has published nearly seventy articles, books, book chapters and reviews, and encyclopedia entries. Her publications include Peerless Images: Persian Painting and Its Sources (2002) and The Windsor Shahnama of 1648 (2007). Forthcoming are a volume in the Nasser D. Khalili Collection of Islamic Art series, a study of the Wellcome Institute Horoscope of the Timurid prince Iskandar-Sultan, and two volumes on later seventeenth-century Safavid painting.

Photo credit: Image 1 -  Dedication Panel, India, 1625; Image 2 - Revetment Tile, Iran 13th–14th century. Denver Art Museum 

Lecture Time: Thursday@Night, July 19, 7pm-8pm
Lecture Location: Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building, Lower Level
Reservations: Please call (720) 913-0040 or email Jana at jgottshalk@denverartmuseum.org

You will be notified if an event is full.

Reception: MAD Beans & Wine Cafe
Reception Location & Time: Acoma Plaza F 8–9 pm
Reception: Free. Reservations required.

 

Sept 19th, 2012

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

Face of the Samurai: The spectacular armor

of feudal Japan

Barry Ellsworth

The Samurai are legendary: ruthless and sophisticated, they built an empire that lasted for four hundred years.  How did these lords dress themselves for battle, and how did they appear to their adversaries and vassals?  Major museum exhibitions at the Metropolitan Museum, San Francisco Asian Art Museum and the Quai Branly in Paris have been dedicated to the unique art form of the armorers of ancient Japan.  Samurai armor expert Barry Ellsworth will introduce the battle garb of the samurai, where exquisitely crafted russet iron, lacquer, silk and gilt filigree combine to create the ferocious mien of the samurai warrior.

Barry Ellsworth holds a BA in art from Brown University.  He is an expert in Samurai armor and accoutrements.   In 2008 he moved his gallery from Paris to Santa Fe, NM.

 

Photos: an armor made by Haruta Koremitsu for Hideyoshi's samurai general Kato Kiyomasa, 16th Century. Collection/ copyright Barry Ellsworth

A "somen" full face samurai mask.  Myochin school, 18th century. Collection/ copyright Barry Ellsworth

 

Time:  12noon - 1pm

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg.,

Denver Art Museum

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 

September 20 - October 11, 2012
- Special Lecture & Gallery Tour Series -
Asian Art Treasures: Highlights of the Denver Art Museum's Asian Collection
Denver Art Museum Docents
The Asian Art Association, working with the Education Department at the Denver Art Museum, will present a four-week special lecture series.  The lectures will be given by museum docents who have done in-depth research to prepare sessions which go beyond the ordinary gallery tour.  The series will be held on Thursdays - September 20 through October 11 - from 1:30 to 3:30 in the museum's Asian art galleries.  Gain new insights and knowledge about the Denver Art Museum's Asian art treasures!  Learn more about the pieces we have right here in our own backyard.  

Photo: Bamboo basket by Hayakawa Shokosai V (b. 1932), Japan1996.  In memory of Paul M. Hoff Jr., Gift of Paul M. Hoff III and Hazel W. Hoff 2001.667

Time: September 20, 27, October 4, 11.  1:30pm - 3:30pm
Location: Denver Art Museum, Ponti (North) Building, Asian Art floor
Reservations: Reservations are required.  The registration fee is $50 for AAA members and $65 for DAM members.  The registration deadline is Wednesday, September 14, 2012.  Series attendance is not prorated for specific dates and topics.  This event is ticketed through the museum's Automatic Ticketing Service.  Tickets will be on sale July 1 - September 28 on the DAM website or by phone at Central Reservations, (720) 913-0310.
Class size is limited to 30 participants (split into groups of 15 each).

 

October 17, 2012

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

Pan Yuliang-Fact or Fiction: Does it Matter?

Sara Sheldon

One of the first women painters of Modern Art in China, the story of Pan Yuliang (1895-1977) has suffered from a lack of data and a surfeit of fiction.  Almost completely unknown in the USA, Pan has had a long life online, in Chinese TV, opera, film, and newsprint.  Sara Sheldon, Art Historian and Administrator as well as author, began research to document the life of Pan Yuliang in 1991 and has remained undaunted by the lockdown of scholarship in China as well as the onslaught of raunchy fiction about the artist seeping into the Western world.

Photos: by Sara Sheldon

 

Time:  12noon - 1pm

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg., Denver Art Museum 

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

November 14, 2012

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

Decoding the Artifacts of the Beifang, The Cowboys Beyond the Great Wall

Emma Bunker

Ancient Chinese texts often mention the Beifang pastoral peoples, horse-riding nomads beyond China’s Great Wall, but their descriptions range from misleading to inaccurate, portraying them as wily, needy, ruthless people without honor constantly harassing their Chinese neighbors. Lacking any written records from the Beifang themselves, modern scholars tend to base their opinions on the Chinese records, viewing theBeifang as a reservoir of ‘barbarian’ features that have periodically contaminated Chinese culture.  In lieu of Beifang written records, I intend to demonstrate that excavated Beifang artifacts can serve as encoded historical records, revealing details of daily life, regional characteristics, metallurgical techniques, and cultural contacts in an area that is culturally far more complex than has been acknowledged in the past.

Photo: Gold Ornament of a coiled doe, Northeast China, ca. 5th - 4th c BCE, Size: 2 ¼” 5.1 cm

Emma C. Bunker, a research consultant to the Denver Art Museum’s Asian Art Department, specializes in the arts of ancient China and Southeast Asia. She received her graduate degree from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, where she studied with Alexander Soper and William Watson. Bunker is a well-known authority on personal adornment in China, the art of the horse-riding tribes of the Eurasian Steppes, and Khmer art of Southeast Asia; her numerous publications have presented groundbreaking research on these subjects. Bunker travels extensively throughout Asia—especially in China, Central Asia, Russia, and Mongolia—and more recently in India, Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand. She currently lives in Wheatland, Wyoming.

 


Time:  12noon - 1pm

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg., Denver Art Museum 

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

Photo: tinned bronze chariot ornament of a ram, ca. 4th c. BCE, Northwest Ordos; Gansu, Ningxia or Mongolia, Size: 7 3/8”

Provenance: Joseph Gerena NY, Eugene V. Thaw Collection

 

 

November 17, 2012

All That Glistens: A Century of Japanese Lacquer Opening Gala 

Carla Stansifer for the lecture, Ron Otsuka for the gallery tour

Asian Art Association (AAA) and Denver Art Museum (DAM) Volunteer Council members are cordially invited to a lecture, gallery tour, and reception to celebrate the opening of All That Glistens: A Century of Japanese Lacquer, on November 17, 2012, before the exhibition opens to the public.  The 30 artworks in this exhibition are recent acquisitions in the DAM's Asian art collection.  Some were purchased with funds raised by the AAA to celebrate its 30th anniversary as a support group for the Asian art department, and some by bequests.  The Sample Box, purchased with funds provided by the DAM Volunteer Council, shows the individual steps, tools, and materials required to make lacquered pieces.

Carla Stansifer, Textile Art Curatorial Assistant at the DAM, will give a lecture on Japanese lacquer techniques and lacquer’s place in early and contemporary Japan.  Ronald Otsuka, Dr. Joseph de Heer curator of Asian art at the DAM, will be available in the gallery after the lecture to discuss the exhibition.

This exhibition reveals the versatility of lacquer as a media used by Japanese artists to create containers, trays, plaques, braziers and screens made by applying lacquer to wood, bamboo, cloth, paper and other materials.  A wide range of techniques is represented, demonstrating how lacquer was used during the last century to create objects of enduring beauty.  The selected artworks reflect the changing styles and tastes of successive generations of lacquer artists who produced designs incorporating plants, animals and elements of nature.  

Documentary filmmaker Carla Stansifer completed her Masters Degree in Japanese Language and Literature, with an emphasis in Museum Studies, at the University of Colorado, Boulder in 2000.  After graduation, she worked as Curatorial Assistant for the Denver Art Museum’s Asian art department.  Carla was subsequently awarded two Fulbright Scholarships to study the Korean language and to study and document lacquer.  This resulted in the production of Korea’s Brilliant Art – All Natural Lacquer, the first film produced in English about Korea’s lacquer arts.  Carla next taught Japanese language and culture at University of Northern Colorado and Colorado State University for two years. Carla is now Textile Art Curatorial Assistant at the Denver Art Museum.

 


Time:  1pm - 4pm

1:00-2:00 pm |  All That Glistens:  Modern and Contemporary Japanese Lacquer,Lecture by Carla Stansifer

2:00-3:00  |  Gallery Opening Tour with Ronald Otsuka

3:00-4:00  |  Tea Reception with Light Delicacies

 

Location:  Ponti Bldg., Denver Art Museum 

Complimentary to all AAA members  & DAM’s Volunteer Executive Board

Admission Fees:  Complimentary to all AAA members  & DAM’s Volunteer Executive Board

DAM staff & teachers, students: TBD

All Others: $ not invited at this time

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 

 

January 16, 2013

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

Vietnam Revisited

Quang Ho

Well known, award winning, Colorado artist Quang Ho came to the United States in 1975 when he was only 12 years old.  He visited his birth country, Vietnam, for the first time in 20 years, in 1995.  The visit, and a subsequent return in 2010, culminated in a profusion of canvases and photographs depicting the people and places of Vietnam.  Ho will present images of his work and discuss how the visits affected his work at this first Wednesday at Noon lecture in 2013.

Photo: Quang Ho, 27 Year Feast, 1995, Oil on Canvas, 30x24, Collection of the artist

Quang Ho was born on April 30, 1963, in Hue, Vietnam. He Immigrated to the United States in 1975 and is now a U.S. Citizen. His artistic interest began at the early age of three and continued through grade school, high school, art school and led him to a very exciting and successful painting profession. In 1980, at the age of 16, Quang held his first one-man-show at Tomorrows Masters Gallery in Denver, Colorado. The exhibit was a smashing success for the high school sophomore. Ho graduated from Colorado Institute of Art in 1985 with Best Portfolio Award for the graduating class.   An art dealer, Mikkel Saks, discovered his talent and promoted Ho in his gallery, which led to much success. Besides creating his own art, Ho teaches at the Denver Art Students League.  In his spare time, he plays golf and reads philosophy and religion extensively. Ho is a great admirer of Andrew Wyeth. 

“painting is a marriage between the mastery of those 'basic visual elements; the discoveries and understanding of visual statements[the search for what is true on a personal level artistically]; and the trust in one’s own wordless intuition and inspiration.”  Quang Ho

 

Time:  12noon - 1pm

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg., Denver Art Museum 

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

Photo: Quang Ho, Vietnam Kitchen 2, Oil on Canvas, 52x52, Collection of the artist

 

 

February 20, 2013

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

Contemplating the Wheel of Life

Gen Kelsang Losel

This ancient Buddhist diagram is much more than a work of art. If we contemplate deeply the most sublime works of art, we cannot gain benefits that compare with the benefits of contemplating and meditating on the Wheel of Life. In this talk, Buddhist nun, Gen Kelsang Losel will explain how this drawing by Buddha Shakyamuni contains a profound teaching about the entire path to freedom and lasting happiness.

Photos: courtesy of Avalokiteshvara Buddhist Center

Gen Kelsang Losel, Resident Teacher of Avalokiteshvara Center in Denver, has been ordained for nearly twenty years and has been teaching Buddhism and Meditation throughout Colorado and beyond for over thirteen years. Moreover, Gen Losel is an experienced Thankgka painter and very knowledgeable in the process, symbolism and iconography of this sacred art. On occasion, Gen Losel teaches a Thangka painting class.

 

Time:  12noon - 1pm

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg., Denver Art Museum 

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 

March 20, 2013

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

Sage of Calligraphy

Antje Richter

The Eastern Jin Dynasty artist and statesman Wang Xizhi (303-361) was admired for his calligraphy already during his lifetime, but it was the powerful favor of later Chinese rulers who established him as the greatest calligrapher of all times, a position that he enjoys down to the present day. The long history of imperial recognition and the ensuing canonization of Wang Xizhi has not only led to the preservation of hundreds of examples of his calligraphic art, but has also profoundly shaped the popular image of the artist. In this talk, I will discuss aspects of Wang Xizhi’s persona as we encounter it through the ages, both in anecdotal and art historical writings and in visual representations (paintings and popular prints) that are at the core of the popular perception of the “Sage of Calligraphy.”

Photo: "Wang Xizhi cherished geese," Qing dynasty, woodblock print, 109x29 cm, Weifang (Shandong) 

Antje Richter studies the culture of early and medieval China, with research interests in literature, art history, religion, and medicine. She received her Ph.D. in 1998 from Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich. From 1998–2007 she taught at the Universities in Kiel and Freiburg in Germany before taking up her current position as Assistant Professor of Chinese in Boulder in 2007. She is the author of a monograph on notions of sleep in early Chinese literature (2001, in German) and of numerous articles on various aspects of Chinese literature, medicine, and art. Her second book, Letter Writing and Epistolary Culture in Early Medieval China, is in print at University of Washington Press. She is also preparing a Handbook of Chinese Letter Writing, to be published with Brill in Leiden as part of the series Handbook of Oriental Studies. Recent articles include “Empty Dreams and Other Omissions: Liu Xie’s Wenxin diaolong Preface” (Asia Major, 2012) and “Beyond Calligraphy: Reading Wang Xizhi’s Letters” (T’oung Pao, 2011).   

 

Time:  12noon - 1pm

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg., Denver Art Museum 

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

Photo: Wang Xizhi, letter, Tang dynasty ink tracing copy on semi-transparent beeswax paper, H 26.3 cm, Liaoning Provincial Museum, Shenyang

 

 

March 29, 2013, at 12pm

New Members Meet, Greet and Private Tour

Location: DAM Asian Art Gallery

RSVP required, by March 22, 2013

The Asian Art Association will be hosting a private event on March 29 for its new members. This event will welcome its newest members and introduce them to the collection via a private tour lead by Ann Thomas.

 

Phone number/email for RSVP and details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 

April 17, 2013

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

Demonic Transformations: Painting Murder and Salvation in the Denver Art Museum's Isozaki Scrolls

Keller Kimbrough

 **Correction to earlier advertising for this event:  Dr. Kimbrough will show slides of the the Isozaki scrolls, but unfortunately the AAA will not be able to display the Denver Art Museum’s scrolls at the lecture.

Within its fine collection of East Asian art, the Denver Art Museum possesses and extraordinary pair of seventeenth-century Japanese picture scrolls.  Titled Isozaki, the scrolls tell the tragic tale of the twelfth-century Lord Isozaki of Shimotsuke Province and his jealous, murderous wife, in alternating passages of text and illustration.  Keller Kimbrough will show slides of the scrolls as he seeks to contextualize them within the wider world of late-medieval Japanese illustrated fiction, paying particular attention to instances of demonic transformation and the rhetoric of Buddhist salvation.  Due to the graphic content of some of his images, Kimbrough's talk is not recommended for small children or the faint of heart. 

Photo: DAM Isozaki 01

Keller Kimbrough is an associate professor of Japanese literature at the University of Colorado, Boulder.  He completed his PhD at Yale University in 1999, and he is the author of Preachers, Poets, Women, and the Way:  Izumi Shikibu and the Buddhist Literature of Medieval Japan(University of Michigan Center for Japanese Studies, 2008) and Wondrous Brutal Fictions:  Eight Buddhist Tales from the Early Japanese Puppet Theater (Columbia University Press, 2013). 

 

Time:  12noon - 1pm

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg., Denver Art Museum 

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 


April 28, 2013, at 2 pm

AAA 5th Annual Annual Afternoon of Indian Music and Dance, Featuring Master Musician Rajeev Taranath

Location: Sharp Auditorium, Hamilton Bldg., Denver Art Museum

Time: 2-4 pm

RSVP required, Please call 720-913-0130  orhttp://www.denverartmuseum.org/calendar/5th-annual-afternoon-indian-music-and-dance-featuring-master-musician-rajeev-taranath

Doors Open at 1pm.  Open seating.  Admission includes refreshments at intermission.  

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 

 

May 15, 2013

- Wednesday at Noon Lecture -

The Wonders of Angkor Wat

John Shors

Internationally bestselling novelist John Shors will disucss his new novel, Temple of a Thousand Faces.  During his talk he will describe the wonders of Angkor Wat and how Angkor Wat inspired him as a writer and a traveler.

Photo: Temple of Thousand Faces:  Book cover designed by Alissa Amell with photographs by Alex Castellino and Andrew Ambraziejus

After graduating from Colorado College, John Shors lived for several years in Kyoto, Japan, where he taught English. On a shoestring budget, he later trekked across Asia, visiting ten countries and climbing the Himalayas. After returning to the United States, he became a newspaper reporter in his hometown, Des Moines, Iowa, winning several statewide awards in journalism. John then moved to Boulder, Colorado, and helped launch GroundFloor Media, now one of the state’s largest public relations firms.  John’s first five novels, Beneath a Marble SkyBeside a Burning SeaDragon HouseThe Wishing Trees, and Cross Currents, have won multiple awards, and have been translated into twenty-five languages.  His latest novel, Temple of a Thousand Faces was released in print on February 5 of this year.

 

Time:  12noon - 1pm

Location:  Lower Level Lecture Room, North Bldg., Denver Art Museum 

Ticket at lecture room door with member discount: Museum admission not required for lecture.

Asian Art Association members Free

Students/ Teachers   $5

DAM members $7

General Public  $10

Phone number/email for details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

 


June 2, 2013, at 11:30am

AAA Annual Meeting, Luncheon and Silent Auction

Location: Phat Thai Restaurant, 2900 E. 2nd Ave, Denver, CO

Time: 11:30am - 2:30pm

RSVP required, by May 28, 2013

**Deadline for donations for AAA's June 2nd Silent Auction has been extended to Friday, May 10th.**

SAVE THE DATE!!  The Asian Art Association will hold its Annual Silent Auction and Members Meeting on Sunday, June 2.   The festivities will include a short business meeting , an Asian buffet luncheon, and bidding on a variety of "treasures".  More details to follow with a mailed invitation.  DONATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED until April 26th.  For pickup and delivery informaton, please contact  Rosemary Fair (Denver Delivery),  303.316.9606 or rrfair1202@gmail.com; Todd Poulson (Denver Pickup) 303-619-9830 , poulson.todd@hotmail.com,  or Joan Scott, (Boulder Delivery and Pickup after April 1), 303-817-5582 or Joan.Scott@Colorado.edu  To RSVP to the Auction luncheon, contact Beverly Little, 720-913-0400 or blittle@denverartmuseum.org. 

Phone number/email for RSVP and details: 720-913-0040   blittle@denverartmuseum.org

Sponsored by:  Asian Art Association

Photo: Phat Thai restaurant, image from CNN